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Hollywoods iconic Cinerama Dome, survivor of 1990s redevelopment, is crushed by COVID

Architecture

Yesterday, the Los Angeleschains-based Decurion Corporation, parent company of Pacific Theaters and ArcLight Cinemas, announced that both COVID-19 will be permanently closed after more than a year of shutdowns due to the Deadline crisis. “This wasn’t the result anyone wanted, but despite great efforts that have exhausted all potential options, the company has no viable path forward,” Decurion stated in a statement shared first by

that stated “difficult and.” passed on sad “news. quite as hard Operating around 300 screens, the 74-year-old Pacific Theaters had substantial real estate across Southern California.For LA moviegoers, the sudden loss of such a large number of screens is undoubtedly significant, but in terms of the shockwaves created by yesterday’s news, none have

as a permanent shutdown of ArcLight Cinemas' flagship location, ArcLight Hollywood , and its Cinerama Dome. Hollywood The Cinerama Dome, which premiered in 1963, is arguably the defining mid-century Los Angeles movie palace and one of geodesic dome’s most enduring and instantly recognizable architectural landmarks. Crowned by an made up of 316 interlocking concrete slabs, it is believed to be the only one of its kind

That same year, the in the world.The theater was designated a Los Angeles Historic and Cultural Monument in 1998. Demolishing several key features of the legendary Hollywood theater. Fending off major changes to the Cinerama Dome has been described as a “great victory” for the Conservancy and its Modern Committee. The Cinerama Dome is clad in 316 hexagonal and pentagonal concrete slabs weighing over 7,000 pounds. (magicredshoes /

black and white photo of a concrete geodesic dome “Few things symbolize Los Angeles better than a cinema, but there is not a single theater in the city that can be compared to the Cinerama Dome as an icon of modern architecture”, writes Flickr/CC BY-ND 2.0)

the Conservancy , to which reference was made The structure as a “clearly visible landmark of Sunset Boulevard from the outside and an incomparable cinematic environment from the inside”. (Following news of the permanent closure of all ArcLight Cinemas locations, including the ArtLight Hollywood Complex and its Cinerama Dome, the Conservancy

that it is “monitoring the situation and pushing for this mid-century entertainment venue to reopen”. ) announced, a French architect who serves as the lead project designer for prolific LA architect Welton Becket’s (designer)

The creation of Pierre Cabrol, the Cinemara Dome of the Beverly Hilton Hotel, Capitol Records Building, Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, etc. was of course made directly by the experimental work influenced by eponymous firm. (Cabrol was indeed a protégé of the architect and futurist). Cinerama, the company behind a relatively new three-projector screening technology,and William R. Forman, founder of Pacific Theaters, attempted to give this avant-garde architecture an island town twist by building a domed geodesic Cinerama theater in the heart of Hollywood on Sunset Boulevard near Vine Street. The plan was To build hundreds of other domed Cinerama geodesic venues across the country. Although other Cinerama theaters were actually built, the Buckminster Fuller were in Tukwilla, Washington, although they did not contain geodesic domes. last opening in 1970 When the Cinerama Dome and its curved, 86-foot-wide screen debuted after a breakneck 16-week build for the premiere of Stanley Kramer’s

. It’s a crazy, crazy, crazy, crazy movie,it was the first new major movie theater to be built in Hollywood in more than three decades. The Fuller-influenced theater with its oversized screen was an instant hit, and Kramer’s film, a Cinerama production with a lens, did not badly either, enjoying a 66-week run. The Cinerama Dome at night. (Courtney “Coco” Mault /

cinerama dome at night In the decades that followed, the Cinerama Dome, a true L., became an architectural landmark that thrived and served as the backdrop for numerous star-studded premieres and special screenings. It has also made countless on-screen cameos, most recently in Quentin Tarantinos Flickr/CC BY 2.0)

Once upon a time in Hollywood .(Strangely enough, no films with Cinerama’s originally patented three-projector screening process were shown until 2002, even though the theater was designed for it). In the 1990s and early childhood, other Cinerama-designed theaters - easily identifiable thanks to their circular shapes that accommodate the massive, contoured screens - were demolished across the country to make way for modern multiplexes and other redevelopment projects . The Cinerama theaters destroyed during this period included the three Cinerama venues originally designed by: Denver’s Richard L. Crowther (demolished in 1994), a Cooper Theater second Cooper Theater in St. Louis Park, Minnesota (demolished in 1992); and the in Omaha (demolished in 2001).Indian Hills Theater While some existing theaters were adapted for Cinerama technology in the mid-20th century, it is believed that only three surviving theaters can show film prints using the original Cinerama technology with three projectors, but which is rarely used: the Cinerama Dome, the

at the National Media Museum in Bradford, England, and the Paul Allen-operated Pictureville Cinema. Like its Hollywood counterpart, the Seattle Cinerama first opened as the Martin Cinerama in 1963. It was closed indefinitely in May 2020 due to the pandemic after a series of costly renovations began in the late 1990s. (The battle to save the Seattle Cinerama from redevelopment mirrored the battle that took place around the same time in Los Angeles took place.) Seattle Cinerama After reopening in 2002 as part of ArcLight Hollywood, the Cinerama Dome was often excited to advertise the blockbusters playing on its mammoth screen. (Yo Shi / After the 1998 conservation struggle to protect the Cinerama Dome from dramatic changes as part of a planned refurbishment project, it was closed for two years for respectful renovations and upgrades, including a new screen and specially designed condition acoustic system of art. In 2002 it reopened as part of the newly built ArcLight Hollywood 15-screen multiplex which was one of the top-grossing cinemas in the U.S. prior to COVID. During the reopening in 2002, the theater began showing films at the original three - Show projector format. In the less than 24 hours since all Pacific Theaters / ArcLight Cinemas locations were permanently closed, an

spiderman on a geodesic roof has already collected signatures north of 2,000 to save Hollywood’s historic Cinerama Dome. While some humorous guesses have been made about the Wikimedia Commons/CC BY-SA 3.0)

gallows who will ultimately acquire the landmark (and the beloved multiplex it has been part of for nearly two decades), there is little doubt that the preservationists, moviegoers, and the bigger Hollywood Community will ensure that the 75-foot-tall, studded golf ball on Sunset Boulevard stays nearby for at least 57 years.

In the less than 24 hours since all Pacific Theaters / ArcLight Cinemas locations were permanently closed, an Change.org petition has already collected signatures north of 2,000 to save Hollywood’s historic Cinerama Dome. While some humorous guesses have been made about the gallows who will ultimately acquire the landmark (and the beloved multiplex it has been part of for nearly two decades), there is little doubt that the preservationists, moviegoers, and the bigger Hollywood Community will ensure that the 75-foot tall studded golf ball on Sunset Boulevard stays nearby for at least 57 years. In the less than 24 hours since all Pacific Theaters / ArcLight Cinemas locations were permanently closed, an

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